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Take My Picture

Polaroid follows a group of friends who have their photo taken by a haunted polaroid camera. As they are killed off one by one by an entity attached to their photo, they must solve the mystery of the camera to survive.

Polaroid Review

Polaroid is standard mainstream Hollywood horror that ignores logic in the worst ways. There was little to salvage of value from the production, though I would put it above The Grudge (2020) and The Turning in regards to entertainment. At least things are moving along, however predictably and moronically.

The fodder for the film is set up like a Final Destination sequel, as you know soon enough they'll be picked off one by one in an order that will eventually be determined. The survivors will gradually realize the truth, led by our socially dysfunctional protagonist who unknowingly releases the evil of the camera due to her insatiable hipster persona. The friends deny her logic at first, then come around as they realize the entity is moving through photos as it takes out victims. So they head to old newspaper clippings and talk with weathered cops to uncover the truth behind the camera. Sound familiar? It's the basic structure of every mainstream horror film, and it is embarrassingly predictable.

Yet, this complete lack of originality is not the most egregious element of the film. I can't stand it when an entity defies the laws of physics in one scene, then seems bound by them the next. This is most apparent when the spirit can't get through a door, but then magically appears down the hall the characters attempt to escape from. Pick a lane, people. But then, perhaps in one of the worst exhibits of this crime I have seen, the teens have proof of their predicament right in front of their faces and they never use it to prove the supernatural happenings to anyone of consequence. Whenever a photo taken by the camera is damaged, it damages the person in the photo in real life. Not only this, but the photo will instantly regenerate when the photo stops being damaged. WHY DON'T YOU SHOW THE AUTHORITIES YOUR MAGICAL PHOTOS SO THEY CAN TRY TO HELP??? Or, at the very least, quit getting in your way. Either way, the logic of not showing people their self-regenerating voodoo photos made no sense to me.

The film just lacked sense in its unique parts and utter unoriginality in everything else. The entity offers little in terms of legitimate thrills or creative design, really only culminating in anything interesting in the climax. The ride is decently paced, so I didn't feel an overwhelming sense of boredom along the way, but it inevitably amounts to nothing special. Despite the hipster camera and a cool finish, there simply isn't much to miss in this one.

Horror Rating System

Horror Qualifier: 9/10 Horror Quality: 4/10

Film Quality: 3/10

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