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Stitched Together

Patchwork follows three women who were murdered and subsequently stitched together by a mad doctor. With all three of their consciousnesses miraculously in tact, the women use their franken-body to exact revenge on the men who have wronged them...and not just the mad scientist.

This movie requires you to dismiss all sense of logic, but thankfully its category of horror comedy makes it easy to do so. It makes the massive plot holes and awkward characters more charming than distracting, which in the end only adds to the flavor of the final product. Patchwork isn't perfect, but it knows that and takes you along for the gags.

Our three lead women do a sterling job moving us through their story. But wait, if they're stitched together, how are there three leads? The director cleverly designed a way of integrating the three women's consciousnesses into the dialogue by manifesting them as themselves in real time. So, in some shots we get the zombified amalgamation, and other shots we get the three women, perfectly fine, bickering with one another over what to do and where to go. It's a nice device that is eloquently and hilariously used.

I can't be sure (and the information doesn't appear in the cast list from what I can see), but it appears Tory Stolper plays the part of Jennifer, one of the three girls, and their amalgamation. If so, kudos to her for her performance! The actresses do a nice job of driving a plot that is beyond ridiculous and makes absolutely no sense. If the body is composed of one person's legs but another person's torso, what does that have to do with the consciousnesses being retained inside one brain? Dismiss your need for logic before entering this film.

But thankfully the film never takes itself seriously, works in a fun twist, and has a climax that had me laughing out loud. Corey Sorenson plays the mad doctor, and all I can say is that his eccentric delivery made me wish he had been on screen more. He was a highlight for the third act.

The effects do their job, limited to some great make-up work for the most part. Yet, we do get an aberration of effects at the end, but it just adds to the hilarity of it all. The film's budget is limited, but that doesn't stop them from throwing in a pointless gag.

Patchwork delivers zero scares, but has plenty of laughs, moves at a nice pace, and gives some revenge carnage along the way. It's important with films like this to step into it knowing what you're getting into. In this case it's a low budget horror comedy that properly allocates its assets to deliver a quality movie that I enjoyed watching.

Horror Qualifier: 6/10

Horror Quality: 5/10

Film Quality: 5/10

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