FEATURED COMIC
POSTS

The Fuzz


Wolfcop Review

Wolfcop follows an alcoholic police officer in a small, crime-ridden town who falls victim to a ritualistic practice and is turned into a werewolf. Despite is newfound animalistic appearance and behavior, the aptly named wolfcop becomes a violent avatar for justice. But can he stop the crime spree that has swept his city before the cult members of the ritual come to reap what they've sown?

Sometimes our comic strip just doesn't convey the true feelings we had for a film. While I referred to Wolfcop as a "steaming pile of crap", I still would happily eat it from a cereal bowl. In other words, the film's balanced self-awareness of its premise allowed it to shine in all the right areas. Like...say...a polished turd.

The film's skeevy humor can be too much to handle sometimes, perhaps too apparent and blatant. But for the most part, the thematic tropes fall in line with the purpose of the film. The movie never once takes itself seriously, remaining in the thick of laughter in between shots of grotesque violence.

The acting feels virtually absent at times, with a story that lacks any depth and yet manages to get lost in itself. But if any film was able to chug along with these weaknesses, it's this film. The cornerstone of every great werewolf film is the transformation scene. The transformation scene often becomes the face from which it is compared, the pillar from which the film stands. Wolfcop's transformation scene is painfully disgusting, but easily memorable and unique...if for one abhorrent moment at the very least.

We are admittedly late to the party on this dark humor gorefest, reviewing it so far beyond its prime that the sequel has already premiered. Yet, it was such a fantastic piece of horror comedy, with a nice blend of purposeful cliches, crass humor, and practical effects. It isn't a movie that I will soon forget, nor should it be. Can't wait to catch the sequel some day soon.

Horror Qualifier: 8/10

Horror Quality: 5/10

Film Quality: 4/10

© 2020 Sickle and Efrit | Dalton Vanhooser & Kyle Hagan